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Poult Sci. 2014 Apr;93(4):1001-9. doi: 10.3382/ps.2013-03403.

Sequential separation of lysozyme, ovomucin, ovotransferrin, and ovalbumin from egg white.

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  • 1WCU Biomodulation Major, Department of Agricultural Biotechnology, College of Agriculture and Life Science, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742, Korea.

Abstract

Ovalbumin, ovotransferrin, ovomucin, and lysozyme are a few of the egg white proteins that can be used as functional components. The objective of this study was to develop a simple, sequential separation method for multiple proteins from egg white. Separated proteins are targeted for human use, and thus any toxic compounds were excluded. The methods for individual components and the sequential separation were practiced in laboratory scale first, and then tested for scale-up. Lysozyme was separated first using FPC3500 cation exchange resin and then ovomucin using isoelectric precipitation. Ovalbumin and ovotransferrin were separated from the lysozyme- and ovomucin-free egg white by precipitating ovotransferrin first using 5.0% (wt/vol) (NH4)2SO4 and 2.5% (wt/vol) citric acid combination. After centrifugation, the supernatant (S1) was used for ovalbumin separation and the precipitant was dissolved in water, and reprecipitated using 2.0% ammonium sulfate (wt/vol) and 1.5% citric acid (wt/vol) combination. The precipitant was used as ovotransferrin fraction, and the supernatant (S2) was pooled with the first supernatant (S1), desalted using ultrafiltration, and then heat-treated to remove impurities. The yield of ovomucin and ovalbumen was >98% and that of ovotransferrin and lysozyme was >82% for both laboratory and scale-up preparations. The SDS-PAGE and western blotting of the separated proteins, except for ovomucin, showed >90% purity. The ELISA results indicated that the activities of separated ovalbumin, ovotransferrin, and lysozyme were >96%. The protocol separated 4 major proteins in sequence, and the method was simple and easily scaled up.

KEYWORDS:

egg white; protein; purity; sequential separation; yield

PMID:
24706978
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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