Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
PLoS One. 2014 Apr 1;9(4):e90227. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0090227. eCollection 2014.

Dietary supplementation with Lactobacilli improves emergency granulopoiesis in protein-malnourished mice and enhances respiratory innate immune response.

Author information

  • 1Immunobiotics Research Group, Reference Centre for Lactobacilli (CERELA-CONICET), San Miguel de Tucuman, Tucuman, Argentina; Laboratory of Immunobiotechnology, Reference Centre for Lactobacilli (CERELA-CONICET), San Miguel de Tucuman, Tucuman, Argentina.
  • 2Immunobiotics Research Group, Reference Centre for Lactobacilli (CERELA-CONICET), San Miguel de Tucuman, Tucuman, Argentina; INSIBIO-CONICET, National University of Tucuman, San Miguel de Tucuman, Tucuman, Argentina.
  • 3Immunobiotics Research Group, Reference Centre for Lactobacilli (CERELA-CONICET), San Miguel de Tucuman, Tucuman, Argentina; Laboratory of Immunobiotechnology, Reference Centre for Lactobacilli (CERELA-CONICET), San Miguel de Tucuman, Tucuman, Argentina; Institute of Applied Biochemistry, Tucuman University, San Miguel de Tucuman, Tucuman, Argentina.

Abstract

This work studied the effect of protein malnutrition on the hemato-immune response to the respiratory challenge with Streptococcus pneumoniae and evaluated whether the dietary recovery with a probiotic strain has a beneficial effect in that response. Three important conclusions can be inferred from the results presented in this work: a) protein-malnutrition significantly impairs the emergency myelopoiesis induced by the generation of the innate immune response against pneumococcal infection; b) repletion of malnourished mice with treatments including nasally or orally administered Lactobacillus rhamnosus CRL1505 are able to significantly accelerate the recovery of granulopoiesis and improve innate immunity and; c) the immunological mechanisms involved in the protective effect of immunobiotics vary according to the route of administration. The study demonstrated that dietary recovery of malnourished mice with oral or nasal administration of L. rhamnosus CRL1505 improves emergency granulopoiesis and that CXCR4/CXCR12 signaling would be involved in this effect. Then, the results summarized here are a starting point for future research and open up broad prospects for future applications of probiotics in the recovery of immunocompromised malnourished hosts.

PMID:
24691464
[PubMed - in process]
PMCID:
PMC3972161
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Public Library of Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk