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QJM. 2014 Sep;107(9):691-9. doi: 10.1093/qjmed/hcu063. Epub 2014 Mar 19.

Primary ciliary dyskinesia.

Author information

  • 1From the Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine and Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of North Carolina, CB 7020, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA leonardlobo@gmail.com.
  • 2From the Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine and Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of North Carolina, CB 7020, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA.

Abstract

Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder of cilia structure and function, leading to chronic infections of the respiratory tract, fertility problems and disorders of organ laterality. Making a definitive diagnosis is challenging, utilizing characteristic phenotypes, ciliary functional and ultra-structural defects in addition to newer screening tools such as nasal nitric oxide and genetic testing. There are 21 known PCD causing genes and in the future, comprehensive genetic testing may help diagnosis young infants prior to developing symptoms thus improving survival. Therapy includes surveillance of pulmonary function and microbiology in addition to, airway clearance, antibiotics and early referral to bronchiectasis centers. Standardized care at specialized centers using a multidisciplinary approach is likely to improve outcomes. In conjunction with the PCD foundation and lead investigators and clinicians are developing a network of PCD clinical centers to coordinate the effort in North America and Europe. As the network grows, care and knowledge will undoubtedly improve.

© The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Association of Physicians. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

PMID:
24652656
[PubMed - in process]
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