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Eval Program Plann. 2014 Jun;44:89-97. doi: 10.1016/j.evalprogplan.2014.02.002. Epub 2014 Feb 14.

Implementation assessment of widely used but understudied prevention programs: an illustration from the Common Sense Parenting trial.

Author information

  • 1National Research Institute for Child and Family Studies, Father Flanagan's Boys' Home, 14100 Crawford Street, Headquarters Building - Mod 12, Boys Town, NE 68010, USA. Electronic address: robert.oats@boystown.org.
  • 2Department of Psychiatry, Box Psych, University of Rochester Medical Center, 300 Crittenden Boulevard, Rochester, NY 14642, USA.
  • 3National Research Institute for Child and Family Studies, Father Flanagan's Boys' Home, 14100 Crawford Street, Headquarters Building - Mod 12, Boys Town, NE 68010, USA.
  • 4Social Development Research Group, School of Social Work, University of Washington, 9725 3rd Avenue NE, Suite 401, Seattle, WA 98115, USA.

Abstract

Common Sense Parenting is a parent-training program that is widely disseminated, has promising preliminary support, and is being tested in a randomized controlled trial that targets lower-income, urban 8th-grade students and their families (recruited in two annual cohorts) to improve the transition to high school. The workshop-based program is being tested in both standard 6-session (CSP) and modified 8-session (CSP Plus) formats; CSP Plus adds adolescent-skills training activities. To offer a comprehensive picture of implementation outcomes in the CSP trial, we describe the tools used to assess program adherence, quality of delivery, program dosage, and participant satisfaction, and report the implementation data collected during the trial. Results indicated that workshop leaders had high adherence to the program content and manual-stated goal times of the CSP/CSP Plus curriculum and delivered the intervention with high quality. The majority of intervention families attended some or all of the sessions. Participant satisfaction ratings for the workshops were high. There were no significant cohort differences for adherence, quality and dosage; however, there were significant cohort improvements for participant satisfaction. Positive fidelity results may be due to the availability of detailed workshop leader guides, in addition to ongoing training and supervision, which included performance-based feedback.

Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Assessment; Fidelity; Implementation; Parent-training; Participant satisfaction; Program adherence; Program dosage; Quality of delivery

PMID:
24632185
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC4073790
Free PMC Article
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