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Am J Cardiol. 2014 May 1;113(9):1509-13. doi: 10.1016/j.amjcard.2014.01.425. Epub 2014 Feb 12.

Comparison of pulmonary vein isolation using cryoballoon versus conventional radiofrequency for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.

Author information

  • 1Heart Rhythm Management Centre, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel-Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium; Department of Cardiology, University Hospital of Verona, Verona, Italy. Electronic address: mugnai.giacomo@gmail.com.
  • 2Heart Rhythm Management Centre, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel-Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to compare the results of pulmonary vein isolation using conventional irrigated radiofrequency (RF) approach versus the cryoballoon (CB) ablation. From January 2008 to December 2011, a total of 426 patients with drug-resistant symptomatic paroxysmal atrial fibrillation underwent pulmonary vein isolation as the index procedure by conventional manual RF or CB ablation at our center. A final population of 396 patients was considered for analysis and divided into 2 groups: conventional RF ablation (n = 260) and CB ablation (n = 136). At a mean follow-up of 23 ± 13 months (median 27, range 4 to 68), the success rate for RF ablation group was 57.3% (149 patients) and was 63.2% (86 patients) for cryoablation group (p = 0.25). Procedural times were significantly shorter in the cryoablation group (192 ± 49 vs 112 ± 58 minutes, p <0.000001) but not fluoroscopy times (36 ± 14 vs 31 ± 17 minutes, p = 0.45). No clinical predictors were found to predict atrial fibrillation recurrences. Complication rates were similar in both groups except for phrenic nerve palsy that was uniquely observed in the CB group (8.1%, p <0.00001). All phrenic nerve palsies resolved during follow-up. In conclusion, on a medium-term follow-up, conventional point-by-point RF ablation and CB ablation showed similar success rates. Procedural times were significantly shorter in the CB approach. The most frequent complication during CB procedures was phrenic nerve palsy, which occurred in 8.1% of patients and resolved in all during the follow-up period.

Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
24630388
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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