Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
PLoS One. 2014 Mar 13;9(3):e90786. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0090786. eCollection 2014.

Gene sequence variability of the three surface proteins of human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) in Texas.

Author information

  • 1Department of Molecular Virology and Microbiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, United States of America; Programa de Virología, Instituto de Ciencias Biomédicas, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Chile, Santiago, Chile; Departamento de Pediatría y Cirugía Infantil Norte, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Chile, Santiago, Chile.
  • 2Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, United States of America.
  • 3Department of Molecular Virology and Microbiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, United States of America.
  • 4Medicine School, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, United States of America.
  • 5Department of Molecular Virology and Microbiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, United States of America; Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, United States of America.

Abstract

Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) has three surface glycoproteins: small hydrophobic (SH), attachment (G) and fusion (F), encoded by three consecutive genes (SH-G-F). A 270-nt fragment of the G gene is used to genotype HRSV isolates. This study genotyped and investigated the variability of the gene and amino acid sequences of the three surface proteins of HRSV strains collected from 1987 to 2005 from one center. Sixty original clinical isolates and 5 prototype strains were analyzed. Sequences containing SH, F and G genes were generated, and multiple alignments and phylogenetic trees were analyzed. Genetic variability by protein domains comparing virus genotypes was assessed. Complete sequences of the SH-G-F genes were obtained for all 65 samples: HRSV-A = 35; HRSV-B = 30. In group A strains, genotypes GA5 and GA2 were predominant. For HRSV-B strains, the genotype GB4 was predominant from 1992 to 1994 and only genotype BA viruses were detected in 2004-2005. Different genetic variability at nucleotide level was detected between the genes, with G gene being the most variable and the highest variability detected in the 270-nt G fragment that is frequently used to genotype the virus. High variability (>10%) was also detected in the signal peptide and transmembrane domains of the F gene of HRSV A strains. Variability among the HRSV strains resulting in non-synonymous changes was detected in hypervariable domains of G protein, the signal peptide of the F protein, a not previously defined domain in the F protein, and the antigenic site Ø in the pre-fusion F. Divergent trends were observed between HRSV -A and -B groups for some functional domains. A diverse population of HRSV -A and -B genotypes circulated in Houston during an 18 year period. We hypothesize that diverse sequence variation of the surface protein genes provide HRSV strains a survival advantage in a partially immune-protected community.

PMID:
24625544
[PubMed - in process]
PMCID:
PMC3953119
Free PMC Article

Images from this publication.See all images (5)Free text

Figure 1
Figure 2
Figure 3
Figure 4
Figure 5
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Icon for Public Library of Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk