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Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2014 Mar 11;11(3):2941-57. doi: 10.3390/ijerph110302941.

Social disparities in children's respiratory health in El Paso, Texas.

Author information

  • 1Department of Sociology and Anthropology, University of Texas of El Paso, 500 West University Ave, El Paso TX 79968, USA. segrineski@utep.edu.
  • 2Department of Sociology and Anthropology, University of Texas of El Paso, 500 West University Ave, El Paso TX 79968, USA. twcollins@utep.edu.
  • 3Department of Sociology and Anthropology, University of Texas of El Paso, 500 West University Ave, El Paso TX 79968, USA. paolachavez95@gmail.com.
  • 4Department of Sociology, University of Minnesota (Twin Cities), Social Science Building, 267 19th Ave. S., Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA. jimen033@umn.edu.
  • 5Department of Sociology and Anthropology, University of Texas of El Paso, 500 West University Ave, El Paso TX 79968, USA. seclarkreyna@miners.utep.edu.
  • 6Department of Social Work, Fayetteville State University, 1200 Murchison Rd, Fayetteville, NC 28301, USA. marie.gaines30@yahoo.com.
  • 7Department of Criminology, Law and Society, University of California Irvine, 2340 Social Ecology II Irvine, CA 92697, USA. youngank@uci.edu.

Abstract

The objectives of this study were to assess prevalence of children's respiratory health conditions and to measure and describe social disparities in children's respiratory problems and access to health resources for asthma/wheezing management. Data were collected through a cross-sectional, observational mail survey of all primary caretakers of 4th and 5th grade children in El Paso Independent School District (El Paso, TX, USA). 6295 primary caretakers received surveys at their home address and 1904 surveys were completed and returned for a 30% response rate. El Paso children have high rates of asthma (17%) and allergies (51%). In terms of social disparities, children that are male, not poor, obese, Hispanic, born in El Paso, have a US-born caretaker, and have a caretaker who has lower levels Spanish proficiency have increased odds of respiratory problems. Among children with asthma and wheezing, disparities exist in access to care; those that are poor, with a Spanish-speaking caretaker, or with a foreign-born caretaker had increased odds of seeking care in urgent care center, emergency rooms and hospitals. Results have scholarly and practical implications for broader trends in terms of increasing prevalence of respiratory health problems across multiple scales (from El Paso to the US context to worldwide) and health disparities experienced within the rapidly growing US Hispanic population.

PMID:
24619157
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3987014
Free PMC Article
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