Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Prev Med. 2014 Jun;63:87-9. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.03.001. Epub 2014 Mar 12.

Improving medicaid health incentives programs: lessons from substance abuse treatment research.

Author information

  • 1Vermont Center on Behavior and Health, University of Vermont, 1 So. Prospect St., UHC Room 1415, Burlington, VT 05401, USA; Department of Psychiatry, University of Vermont, 1 So. Prospect St., UHC Room 1415, Burlington, VT 05401, USA. Electronic address: dennis.hand@uvm.edu.
  • 2Vermont Center on Behavior and Health, University of Vermont, 1 So. Prospect St., UHC Room 1415, Burlington, VT 05401, USA; Department of Psychiatry, University of Vermont, 1 So. Prospect St., UHC Room 1415, Burlington, VT 05401, USA; Department of Psychology, University of Vermont, 1 So. Prospect St., UHC Room 1415, Burlington, VT 05401, USA.

Abstract

This commentary addresses the efforts of Medicaid programs in several US states to employ financial incentives to increase healthy behavior among their beneficiaries. While these Medicaid incentive programs have been successful at boosting rates of less effortful behaviors, like semiannual dental visits, they have fallen short in promoting more complex behaviors, like smoking cessation, drug abstinence, and weight management. Incentives have been extensively studied as a treatment for substance use disorders for over 20years, with good success. We identify two variables shown by meta-analysis to moderate the efficacy of incentive interventions in substance abuse treatment, the immediacy of incentive delivery and size (or magnitude) of the incentive, that are lacking in current Medicaid incentive program. We also offer some guidance on how these moderating variables could be addressed within Medicaid programs. This is a critical time for such analysis, as more than 10 states are employing incentives in their Medicaid programs, and some are currently reevaluating their incentive strategies.

Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Behavioral economics; Health plan implementation; Health planning; Health planning guidelines; Meidcaid; Substance-related disorders

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk