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Med Mal Infect. 2014 Apr;44(4):154-8. doi: 10.1016/j.medmal.2014.01.012. Epub 2014 Mar 4.

Antifungal stewardship: implementation in a French teaching hospital.

Author information

  • 1Centre hospitalier de Tourcoing, 155, rue du Président-Coty, 59200 Tourcoing, France. Electronic address: alfandari.s@gmail.com.
  • 2Service des maladies du sang, centre hospitalier régional et universitaire de Lille, 59037 Lille, France.

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Invasive fungal infections are responsible for severe morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. New, more effective antifungal drugs have been available for more than a decade but are extremely expensive suggesting the need for judicious prescribing.

INTERVENTION:

Infectious diseases physicians had been closely collaborating with hematologists on antimicrobial use since 2000. In 2002, an antifungal stewardship program (ASP) was implemented. It included discussing antifungal prescriptions with a dedicated infectious diseases physician twice weekly, telephone counseling 5 days a week from 9 A.M. to 7 P.M., and training meetings for junior/senior prescribers organized at least once yearly. The same year, a multidisciplinary group drafted evidence-based local guidelines on the use of antifungals in the hematology unit, which were published in 2004. These guidelines included decision algorithms and preprinted prescription forms that allowed only guideline-recommended drugs for a given indication. These guidelines have been updated and simplified at least every 2 years (current version 7.0; 2012).

RESULTS:

Between 2003 and 2012, in the 20-bed isolated hematology sector (allograft and acute leukemia induction chemotherapy patients), antifungal consumption decreased by 40% (from approximately 1000 to 620 defined daily doses per 1000 hospitalization days). Invasive fungal infections (IFI) remained stable in the whole 51-bed department, during the study period, with 1 to 2 IFI per month. In 2005, the 12-week survival rate for 29 cases of invasive aspergillosis was 72%. Early IFI related mortality has decreased recently.

CONCLUSION:

A permanent collaboration between hematologists and an infectious diseases physician can improve antifungal prescribing.

Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Antifungal stewardship; Infections fongiques invasives; Invasive fungal infection; Pharmaco-economics; Pharmacoéconomie

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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