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Magn Reson Med. 2014 Feb 25. doi: 10.1002/mrm.25144. [Epub ahead of print]

Susceptibility-based analysis of dynamic gadolinium bolus perfusion MRI.

Author information

  • 1The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA; FM Kirby Research Center for Functional Brain Imaging, Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, Maryland.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

An algorithm is developed for the reconstruction of dynamic, gadolinium (Gd) bolus MR perfusion images of the human brain, based on quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM).

METHODS:

The method is evaluated in five perfusion scans obtained from four different patients scanned at 3 Tesla, and compared with the conventional analysis based on changes in the transverse relaxation rate ΔR2 * and to theoretical predictions. QSM images were referenced to ventricular cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) for each dynamic of the perfusion sequence.

RESULTS:

Images of cerebral blood flow and blood volume were successfully reconstructed from the QSM-analysis, and were comparable to those reconstructed using ΔR2 *. The magnitudes of the Gd-associated susceptibility effects in gray and white matter were consistent with theoretical predictions.

CONCLUSION:

QSM-based analysis may have some theoretical advantages compared with ΔR2 *, including a simpler relationship between signal change and Gd concentration. However, disadvantages are its much lower contrast-to-noise ratio, artifacts due to respiration and other effects, and more complicated reconstruction methods. More work is required to optimize data acquisition protocols for QSM-based perfusion imaging. Magn Reson Med, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

KEYWORDS:

cerebral blood flow; dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI; perfusion; quantitative susceptibility mapping

PMID:
24604343
[PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
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