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Trends Microbiol. 2014 Apr;22(4):183-91. doi: 10.1016/j.tim.2014.01.010. Epub 2014 Feb 26.

Bat-derived influenza-like viruses H17N10 and H18N11.

Author information

  • 1CAS Key Laboratory of Pathogenic Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Microbiology, Chineses Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China. Electronic address: wuying@im.ac.cn.
  • 2CAS Key Laboratory of Pathogenic Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Microbiology, Chineses Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China.
  • 3CAS Key Laboratory of Pathogenic Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Microbiology, Chineses Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China.
  • 4CAS Key Laboratory of Pathogenic Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Microbiology, Chineses Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China; Research Network of Immunity and Health (RNIH), Beijing Institutes of Life Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China.
  • 5CAS Key Laboratory of Pathogenic Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Microbiology, Chineses Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China; Research Network of Immunity and Health (RNIH), Beijing Institutes of Life Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China; Office of Director-General, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention (China CDC), Beijing 102206, China. Electronic address: gaof@im.ac.cn.

Abstract

Shorebirds and waterfowls are believed to be the reservoir hosts for influenza viruses, whereas swine putatively act as mixing vessels. The recent identification of two influenza-like virus genomes (designated H17N10 and H18N11) from bats has challenged this notion. A crucial question concerns the role bats might play in influenza virus ecology. Structural and functional studies of the two major surface envelope proteins, hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA), demonstrate that neither has canonical HA or NA functions found in influenza viruses. However, putative functional modules and domains in other encoded proteins are conserved, and the N-terminal domain of the H17N10 polymerase subunit PA has a classical structure and function. Therefore, potential genomic reassortments of such influenza-like viruses with canonical influenza viruses cannot be excluded at this point and should be assessed.

Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

H17N10; H18N11; PA; bat-derived influenza-like virus; hemagglutinin (HA); neuraminidase (NA); reassortment

PMID:
24582528
[PubMed - in process]
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