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Ticks Tick Borne Dis. 2014 Apr;5(3):318-22. doi: 10.1016/j.ttbdis.2013.12.004. Epub 2014 Feb 23.

Identification and partial characterization of a Salp15 homolog from Ixodes ricinus.

Author information

  • 1Division of Veterinary Infection Biology and Immunology, Department of Molecular Infection Biology, Research Center Borstel, Germany.
  • 2Division of Veterinary Infection Biology and Immunology, Department of Molecular Infection Biology, Research Center Borstel, Germany. Electronic address: mbakheit@fz-borstel.de.

Abstract

The immunomodulatory molecule Salp15 is originally described in Ixodes scapularis and has been shown to inhibit CD4 T cell activation. Many Salp15 homologs have been described from Ixodes species, and all were well conserved at C-terminal residues that seem to be essential for the function of the protein. In this study, a gene sequence was amplified from cDNA isolated from engorged female I. ricinus ticks, which was predicted to generate a protein of 12.3 kDa. The protein displayed distinct amino acid differences from previously described I. ricinus Salp15 homologs, with amino acid identity ranging between 46.6% and 93.9%. It was referred to as I. ricinus Salp15-like protein. The protein showed 48.1% sequence identity to I. scapularis Salp15. We analyzed the effect of the recombinant I. ricinus Salp15-like protein on the production of cytokines from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated with LPS. The recombinant protein exerted no effect on the production of TNF-α and IL-6, but the production of IL-10 was dose-dependently reduced. It can be concluded that I. ricinus Salp15-like protein exerts an immunomodulatory effect on the host. The inhibition of IL-10 production may possibly lead to a retardation of B cell activity.

Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

IL-10; IL-6; Ixodes ricinus; Salivary glands; Salp15; TNF-α

PMID:
24572608
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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