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Am J Surg. 2014 May;207(5):653-7; discussion 657-8. doi: 10.1016/j.amjsurg.2013.12.011. Epub 2014 Jan 31.

A booming economy means a bursting trauma system: association between hospital admission for major injury and indicators of economic activity in a large Canadian health region.

Author information

  • 1Department of Surgery, University of Calgary, Foothills Medical Centre, 1403-29th Street Northwest, Calgary, AB T2N 2T9, Canada; Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Foothills Medical Centre, 1403-29th Street Northwest, Calgary, AB T2N 2T9, Canada.
  • 2Department of Surgery, University of Calgary, Foothills Medical Centre, 1403-29th Street Northwest, Calgary, AB T2N 2T9, Canada.
  • 3Department of Regional Trauma Services, University of Calgary, Foothills Medical Centre, 1403-29th Street Northwest, Calgary, AB T2N 2T9, Canada.
  • 4Department of Surgery, University of Calgary, Foothills Medical Centre, 1403-29th Street Northwest, Calgary, AB T2N 2T9, Canada; Department of Regional Trauma Services, University of Calgary, Foothills Medical Centre, 1403-29th Street Northwest, Calgary, AB T2N 2T9, Canada; Department of Critical Care Medicine, University of Calgary, Foothills Medical Centre, 1403-29th Street Northwest, Calgary, AB T2N 2T9, Canada.
  • 5Department of Surgery, University of Calgary, Foothills Medical Centre, 1403-29th Street Northwest, Calgary, AB T2N 2T9, Canada; Department of Regional Trauma Services, University of Calgary, Foothills Medical Centre, 1403-29th Street Northwest, Calgary, AB T2N 2T9, Canada.
  • 6Department of Surgery, University of Calgary, Foothills Medical Centre, 1403-29th Street Northwest, Calgary, AB T2N 2T9, Canada; Department of Regional Trauma Services, University of Calgary, Foothills Medical Centre, 1403-29th Street Northwest, Calgary, AB T2N 2T9, Canada; Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Foothills Medical Centre, 1403-29th Street Northwest, Calgary, AB T2N 2T9, Canada. Electronic address: Ball.Chad@gmail.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Injury epidemiology fluctuates with economic activity in many countries. These relationships remain unclear in Canada.

METHODS:

The annual risk of admission for major injury (Injury Severity Score ≥12) to a high-volume, level-1 Canadian trauma center was compared with indicators of economic activity over a 16-year period using linear regression.

RESULTS:

An increased risk of injured patient admissions was associated with rising mean gross domestic product (GDP [millions of chained 2002 dollars]) (.36 person increase per 100,000 population/$1,000 increase in GDP; P = .001) and annual gasoline prices (.47 person increase per 100,000 population/cent increase in gasoline price; P = .001). Recreation-related vehicle injuries were also associated with economic affluence. The risk of trauma patient mortality with increasing mean annual GDP (P = .72) and gasoline prices (P = .32) remained unchanged.

CONCLUSION:

Hospital admissions for major injury, but not trauma patient mortality, were associated with economic activity in a large Canadian health care region.

Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Ecological study; Economic indicators; Major trauma; Wounds and injuries

PMID:
24560360
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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