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Front Physiol. 2014 Feb 4;5:36. doi: 10.3389/fphys.2014.00036. eCollection 2014.

Stem cell sources for tooth regeneration: current status and future prospects.

Author information

  • 1Division of Developmental Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Department of Anatomy, Iwate Medical University Yahaba, Japan.
  • 2Division of Developmental Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Department of Anatomy, Iwate Medical University Yahaba, Japan ; Division of Special Care Dentistry, Department of Developmental Oral Health Science, Iwate Medical University Morioka, Japan.
  • 3INSERM UMR 1109, team "Osteoarticular and Dental Regenerative NanoMedicine", Faculté de Médecine, Université de Strasbourg Strasbourg, France.
  • 4INSERM UMR 1109, team "Osteoarticular and Dental Regenerative NanoMedicine", Faculté de Médecine, Université de Strasbourg Strasbourg, France ; Faculté de Chirurgie dentaire, Université de Strasbourg Strasbourg, France.

Abstract

Stem cells are capable of renewing themselves through cell division and have the remarkable ability to differentiate into many different types of cells. They therefore have the potential to become a central tool in regenerative medicine. During the last decade, advances in tissue engineering and stem cell-based tooth regeneration have provided realistic and attractive means of replacing lost or damaged teeth. Investigation of embryonic and adult (tissue) stem cells as potential cell sources for tooth regeneration has led to many promising results. However, technical and ethical issues have hindered the availability of these cells for clinical application. The recent discovery of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells has provided the possibility to revolutionize the field of regenerative medicine (dentistry) by offering the option of autologous transplantation. In this article, we review the current progress in the field of stem cell-based tooth regeneration and discuss the possibility of using iPS cells for this purpose.

KEYWORDS:

bioengineered tooth; iPS cells; neural crest; stem cells; teratomas; tissue engineering; tooth regeneration

PMID:
24550845
[PubMed]
PMCID:
PMC3912331
Free PMC Article

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