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J Am Coll Cardiol. 2014 May 6;63(17):1703-14. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2014.01.017. Epub 2014 Feb 12.

Coronary artery calcification: pathogenesis and prognostic implications.

Author information

  • 1New York-Presbyterian Hospital and the Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York.
  • 2Cardiovascular Research Foundation, New York, New York.
  • 3New York-Presbyterian Hospital and the Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; Cardiovascular Research Foundation, New York, New York.
  • 4New York-Presbyterian Hospital and the Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; Cardiovascular Research Foundation, New York, New York; Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. Electronic address: pg2295@columbia.edu.

Abstract

Coronary artery calcification (CAC) is a risk factor for adverse outcomes in the general population and in patients with coronary artery disease. The pathogenesis of CAC and bone formation share common pathways, and risk factors have been identified that contribute to the initiation and progression of CAC. Efforts to control CAC with medical therapy have not been successful. Event-free survival is also reduced in patients with coronary calcification after both percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and bypass graft surgery. Although drug-eluting stents and devices for plaque modification have modestly improved outcomes in calcified vessels, adverse event rates are still high. Innovative pharmacologic and device-based approaches are needed to improve the poor prognosis of patients with CAC.

Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

PCI; coronary artery calcification; coronary artery disease

PMID:
24530667
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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