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Phys Ther Sport. 2014 May;15(2):124-9. doi: 10.1016/j.ptsp.2013.11.002. Epub 2013 Nov 15.

Imaging and clinical tests for the diagnosis of long-standing groin pain in athletes. A systematic review.

Author information

  • 1Department of Physiotherapy, School of Health Science, University of Newcastle, University Drive, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia; Department of Physical Therapies, Australian Institute of Sport, Leverrier Cr, Bruce, ACT 2617, Australia. Electronic address: michaelkdrew@gmail.com.
  • 2Department of Physiotherapy, School of Health Science, University of Newcastle, University Drive, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia. Electronic address: peter.osmotherly@newcastle.edu.au.
  • 3Department of Physiotherapy, School of Health Science, University of Newcastle, University Drive, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia. Electronic address: pauline.chiarelli@newcastle.edu.au.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To examine the validity of clinical tests available for the diagnosis of longstanding groin pain in athletes.

DESIGN:

Systematic review.

METHOD:

A published search strategy of MeSH terms in MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, and SportDiscuss. Inclusion criteria: diagnostic studies relating to athletic groin pain, professional or semi-professional athletes, symptoms lasting for more than six weeks, and not limited by age or gender. A priori exclusion criteria were utilised. Outcome measures: QUADAS tool, sensitivity and specificity, likelihood ratios and predictive values of the reported tests and investigations.

RESULTS:

577 Journal articles were identified. Five studies met all requirements. Sensitivity and specificity of clinical tests ranged between 30 and 100% and 88 and 95% respectively with negative likelihood ratio of 0.15-0.78 and positive likelihood ratios of 1.0-11.0. Sensitivity and specificity of investigations (MRI, herniography, and dynamic ultrasound) ranged between 68% and 100% as well as 33% and 100% respectively with negative likelihood ratios between 0 and 0.32 and positive likelihood ratios between 1.5 and 8.1.

CONCLUSION:

There is a lack of validated diagnostic clinical tests available for clinicians and a lack of symptomology being evaluated. It is recommended that a reference standard should be applied and data should be reported in sufficient detail to calculate diagnostic statistics that is useful to the clinician.

Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Athletic injury; Diagnosis; Groin; Systematic review

PMID:
24529632
[PubMed - in process]

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