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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2014 Apr;95(4):595-6. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2013.11.014. Epub 2014 Feb 14.

Rethinking the continuum of stroke rehabilitation.

Author information

  • 1Aging, Rehabilitation, and Geriatric Care, Lawson Health Research Institute, St. Joseph's Parkwood Hospital, London, ON, Canada; Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, ON, Canada; St. Joseph's Healthcare, St. Joseph's Parkwood Hospital, London, ON, Canada. Electronic address: Robert.Teasell@sjhc.london.on.ca.
  • 2Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, University of Navarra, Pamplona, Navarra, Spain.
  • 3Aging, Rehabilitation, and Geriatric Care, Lawson Health Research Institute, St. Joseph's Parkwood Hospital, London, ON, Canada.

Abstract

Suffering a stroke can be a devastating and life-changing event. Although there is a large evidence base for stroke rehabilitation in the acute and subacute stages, it has been long accepted that patients with stroke reach a plateau in their rehabilitation recovery relatively early. We have recently published the results of a systematic review designed to identify all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) where a rehabilitation intervention was initiated more than 6 months after the onset of the stroke. Of the trials identified, 339 RCTs met inclusion criteria, demonstrating an evidence base for stroke rehabilitation in the chronic phase as well. This seems at odds with the assumption that further recovery is unlikely and the subsequent lack of resources devoted to chronic stroke rehabilitation and management.

Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Controlled clinical trials, randomized; Rehabilitation; Stroke

PMID:
24529594
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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