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Cell. 2014 Feb 13;156(4):633-48. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2014.01.052.

Structural insights on the role of antibodies in HIV-1 vaccine and therapy.

Author information

  • 1Division of Biology and Biological Engineering, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA. Electronic address: apwest@caltech.edu.
  • 2Division of Biology and Biological Engineering, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA.
  • 3Laboratory of Molecular Immunology, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY 10065, USA.
  • 4Division of Biology and Biological Engineering, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA.
  • 5Laboratory of Molecular Immunology, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY 10065, USA; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY 10065, USA. Electronic address: nussen@rockefeller.edu.

Abstract

Despite 30 years of effort, there is no effective vaccine for HIV-1. However, antibodies can prevent HIV-1 infection in humanized mice and macaques when passively transferred. New single-cell-based methods have uncovered many broad and potent donor-derived antibodies, and structural studies have revealed the molecular bases for their activities. The new data suggest why such antibodies are difficult to elicit and inform HIV-1 vaccine development efforts. In addition to protecting against infection, the newly identified antibodies can suppress active infections in mice and macaques, suggesting they could be valuable additions to anti-HIV-1 therapies and to strategies to eradicate HIV-1 infection.

Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PMID:
24529371
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC4041625
Free PMC Article
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