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J Urol. 2014 Aug;192(2):524-9. doi: 10.1016/j.juro.2014.01.101. Epub 2014 Feb 8.

Surgical outcomes and cultural perceptions in international hypospadias care.

Author information

  • 1Program in Global Surgery and Social Change, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Plastic and Oral Surgery, Children's Hospital Boston, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Urology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California. Electronic address: ian.metzler@childrens.harvard.edu.
  • 2Department of Urology, Children's Hospital Boston, Boston, Massachusetts; IVUmed, Salt Lake City, Utah.
  • 3Program in Global Surgery and Social Change, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Plastic and Oral Surgery, Children's Hospital Boston, Boston, Massachusetts; Pediatric Surgery and International Pediatrics, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
  • 4Hôpital Général de Grand Yoff, Dakar, Senegal.
  • 5Khanh Hoa Hospital, Nha Trang, Vietnam.
  • 6IVUmed, Salt Lake City, Utah; Department of Urology, Primary Children's Medical Center, Salt Lake City, Utah.
  • 7Program in Global Surgery and Social Change, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Plastic and Oral Surgery, Children's Hospital Boston, Boston, Massachusetts.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This study was designed to assess perceptions of untreated hypospadias and quality of life in culturally disparate low or middle income countries, to highlight the demographic and care differences of patient groups treated for hypospadias in the surgical workshop context, and to evaluate the long-term outcomes achieved by these workshop groups.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Family member perceptions of hypospadias, perioperative process measures and urethrocutaneous fistula rates were compared between 60 patients from Vietnam and Senegal treated for hypospadias through training workshops by local surgeons and pediatric urologists from the U.S. between 2009 and 2012, of whom approximately 42% had previously undergone repair attempts.

RESULTS:

More than 90% of respondents surveyed believed that untreated hypospadias would affect the future of their child at least to some degree. Patient cohorts between the 2 sites differed from each other and published high income country cohorts regarding age, weight for age and frequency of reoperation. Telephone based outcomes assessment achieved an 80% response rate. Urethrocutaneous fistula was reported in 39% and 47% of patients in Vietnam and Senegal, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS:

Family members perceived that the social consequences of untreated hypospadias would be severe. Relative to patient cohorts reported in practices of high income countries, our patients were older, presented with more severe defects, required more reoperations and were often undernourished. Urethrocutaneous fistula rates were higher in cohorts from low or middle income countries relative to published rates for cohorts from high income countries. Our study suggests that outcomes measurement is a feasible and essential component of ethical international health care delivery and improvement.

Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

fistula; hypospadias; male; urologic surgical procedures

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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