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Am J Prev Med. 2014 Mar;46(3 Suppl 1):S73-80. doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2013.10.030.

Opportunities for cancer prevention during midlife: highlights from a meeting of experts.

Author information

  • 1Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, CDC, Atlanta, Georgia. Electronic address: dholman@cdc.gov.
  • 2Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, CDC, Atlanta, Georgia.

Abstract

This paper provides highlights from a CDC-hosted meeting on opportunities for cancer prevention during midlife (roughly ages 45-64 years). Positive changes during this phase of life have the potential to prevent cancer incidence later in life, making this phase an opportune time for targeted prevention efforts to facilitate healthy aging and increased longevity. Risk and protective factors discussed during the meeting included exposure to radiation from medical imaging procedures, circadian disruption, chemical exposures, dietary factors, alcohol consumption, obesity, physical activity, diabetes, and the human microbiome. Although many of these factors are well recognized as being related to cancer incidence, others are not as widely recognized or have emerged as growing areas of research. Meeting participants discussed promising strategies for cancer prevention targeting this age group. Just as there are multiple determinants of cancer risk, there are likely multiple solutions. Changes to social and physical environments may facilitate healthy behaviors and minimize harmful exposures. Information shared during the meeting about health disparities in the U.S. highlighted the need to go beyond traditional approaches to cancer prevention to truly reach vulnerable populations. Partnerships are also a key component to prevention efforts; community-based and nonprofit organizations, the healthcare system, research institutions, state health departments, and federal agencies were all noted as important partners in prevention efforts. Coordinated, multi-disciplinary efforts across multiple chronic diseases may provide opportunities for synergistic effects. Further, leveraging key partnerships and existing communication channels can maximize success and facilitate timely translation of research findings into public health practice.

Published by Elsevier Inc.

PMID:
24512934
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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