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J Occup Rehabil. 2014 Dec;24(4):670-9. doi: 10.1007/s10926-014-9499-4.

Influence of health on job-search behavior and re-employment: the role of job-search cognitions and coping resources.

Author information

  • 1Department of Public Health, Erasmus MC, PO Box 2040, 3000 CA, Rotterdam, The Netherlands, b.carlier@erasmusmc.nl.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To investigate the influence of poor health on job-search behavior and re-employment, and the mediating role of job-search cognitions and coping resources.

METHODS:

A prospective study was conducted among unemployed persons receiving social security benefits in the Netherlands (n = 510). Self-rated health, self-esteem, mastery, job-search cognitions, and the intention to search for a job were measured at baseline. Logistic regression analysis was used to investigate determinants of job-search behavior during a follow-up period of 6 months. Cox proportional hazards analysis was used to investigate the influence of health, job-search cognitions and coping resources on re-employment during a mean follow-up period of 23 months.

RESULTS:

Persons with poor health were less likely to search for paid employment (OR 0.58, 95 % CI 0.39-0.85) and were also less likely to find paid employment (HR 0.58, 95 % CI 0.39-0.89). Persons with a positive attitude toward job-search, high perceived social pressure to look for a job, high job-search self-efficacy and high job-search intention were more likely to search actively and also to actually find paid employment. Adjustment for job-search cognitions and coping reduced the influence of health on active search behavior by 50 % and on re-employment by 33 %.

CONCLUSIONS:

Health-related differences in job-search behavior and re-employment can be partly explained by differences in coping, job-search attitude, self-efficacy, and subjective norms towards job-search behavior. Measures to reduce the negative impact of poor health on re-employment should address the interplay of health with job-search cognitions and coping resources.

PMID:
24510518
[PubMed - in process]
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