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Exp Mol Pathol. 2014 Apr;96(2):178-87. doi: 10.1016/j.yexmp.2014.02.001. Epub 2014 Feb 6.

Divergent and dynamic activity of endogenous retroviruses in burn patients and their inflammatory potential.

Author information

  • 1Shriners Hospitals for Children Northern California, Sacramento, CA 95817, USA; Department of Surgery, University of California, Davis, Sacramento, CA 95817, USA.
  • 2Shriners Hospitals for Children Northern California, Sacramento, CA 95817, USA.
  • 3Unit for Laboratory Animal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0614, USA.
  • 4Department of Surgery, Saint Joseph Mercy Health System, Ann Arbor, MI 48106, USA.
  • 5Shriners Hospitals for Children Northern California, Sacramento, CA 95817, USA; Department of Surgery, University of California, Davis, Sacramento, CA 95817, USA. Electronic address: kcho@ucdavis.edu.

Abstract

Genes constitute ~3% of the human genome, whereas human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) represent ~8%. We examined post-burn HERV expression in patients' blood cells, and the inflammatory potentials of the burn-associated HERVs were evaluated. Buffy coat cells, collected at various time points from 11 patients, were screened for the expression of eight HERV families, and we identified their divergent expression profiles depending on patient, HERV, and time point. The population of expressed HERV sequences was patient-specific, suggesting HERVs' inherent genomic polymorphisms and/or differential expression potentials depending on characteristics of patients and courses of injury response. Some HERVs were shared among the patients, while the others were divergent. Interestingly, one burn-associated HERV gag gene from a patient's genome induced IL-6, IL-1β, Ptgs-2, and iNOS. These findings demonstrate that injury stressors initiate divergent HERV responses depending on patient, HERV, and disease course and implicate HERVs as genetic elements contributing to polymorphic injury pathophysiology.

Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Burn patient; Divergent injury response; HERV polymorphism

PMID:
24509167
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC4104748
[Available on 2015/4/1]
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