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Mol Breed. 2014;33:89-104. Epub 2013 Aug 15.

Optimized breeding strategies for multiple trait integration: I. Minimizing linkage drag in single event introgression.

Author information

  • 1Department of Crop Sciences and the Illinois Plant Breeding Center, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1102 S. Goodwin Ave., Urbana, IL 61801 USA ; Monsanto Company/Seminis Vegetable Seeds, Felda, FL USA.
  • 2Department of Crop Sciences and the Illinois Plant Breeding Center, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1102 S. Goodwin Ave., Urbana, IL 61801 USA ; Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis, IN USA.
  • 3Department of Crop Sciences and the Illinois Plant Breeding Center, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1102 S. Goodwin Ave., Urbana, IL 61801 USA.

Abstract

From a breeding standpoint, multiple trait integration (MTI) is a four-step process of converting an elite variety/hybrid for value-added traits (e.g. transgenic events) using backcross breeding, ultimately regaining the performance attributes of the target hybrid along with reliable expression of the value-added traits. In the light of the overarching goal of recovering equivalent performance in the finished conversion, this study focuses on the first step of MTI, single event introgression, exploring the feasibility of marker-aided backcross conversion of a target maize hybrid for 15 transgenic events, incorporating eight events into the female hybrid parent and seven into the male parent. Single event introgression is conducted in parallel streams to convert the recurrent parent (RP) for individual events, with the primary objective of minimizing residual non-recurrent parent (NRP) germplasm, especially in the chromosomal proximity to the event (i.e. linkage drag). In keeping with a defined lower limit of 96.66 % overall RP germplasm recovery (i.e. ≤120 cM NRP germplasm given a genome size of 1,788 cM), a breeding goal for each of the 15 single event conversions was developed: <8 cM of residual NRP germplasm across the genome with ~1 cM in the 20 cM region flanking the event. Using computer simulation, we aimed to identify optimal breeding strategies for single event introgression to achieve this breeding goal, measuring efficiency in terms of number of backcross generations required, marker data points needed, and total population size across generations. Various selection schemes classified as three-stage, modified two-stage, and combined selection conducted from BC1 through BC3, BC4, or BC5 were compared. The breeding goal was achieved with a selection scheme involving five generations of marker-aided backcrossing, with BC1 through BC3 selected for the event of interest and minimal linkage drag at population size of 600, and BC4 and BC5 selected for the event of interest and recovery of the RP germplasm across the genome at population size of 400, with selection intensity of 0.01 for all generations. In addition, strategies for choice of donor parent to facilitate conversion efficiency and quality were evaluated. Two essential criteria for choosing an optimal donor parent for a given RP were established: introgression history showing reduction of linkage drag to ~1 cM in the 20 cM region flanking the event and genetic similarity between the RP and potential donor parents. Computer simulation demonstrated that single event conversions with <8 cM residual NRP germplasm can be accomplished by BC5 with no genetic similarity, by BC4 with 30 % genetic similarity, and by BC3 with 86 % genetic similarity using previously converted RPs as event donors. This study indicates that MTI to produce a 'quality' 15-event-stacked hybrid conversion is achievable. Furthermore, it lays the groundwork for a comprehensive approach to MTI by outlining a pathway to produce appropriate starting materials with which to proceed with event pyramiding and trait fixation before version testing.

KEYWORDS:

Breeding strategy; Computer simulation; Linkage drag; Marker-aided backcross; Multiple trait integration; Single event introgression

PMID:
24482600
[PubMed]
PMCID:
PMC3890577
Free PMC Article
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