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Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2014 Feb;38(2):322-6. doi: 10.1111/acer.12277. Epub 2013 Oct 29.

Time dependence of elimination of different PEth homologues in alcoholics in comparison with social drinkers.

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  • 1Institute of Forensic Medicine, University Medical Centre, Freiburg, Germany.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Phosphatidylethanol (PEth) is a direct marker of alcohol consumption, which has been known for almost 30 years. Each PEth molecule carries 2 fatty acids, which differ in chain length and degree of unsaturation. It is formed by means of phospholipase D in the presence of ethanol. Usually, this marker was used by quantification of the PEth homologue 16:0/18:1. The intention of this work was to get more information about the distribution and the quantity of the different PEth homologues.

METHODS:

Blood samples from 12 alcohol-dependent subjects were collected and analyzed during withdrawal therapy. For comparison, blood from 78 healthy social drinkers was also analyzed. PEth analysis was performed as follows: after liquid-liquid extraction, the homologues were separated on a Luna Phenyl Hexyl column, injected to an HPLC system (1100 system; Agilent) and identified by ESI-MS/MS (QTrap 2000; AB Sciex) using multiple reaction monitoring.

RESULTS:

PEth 16:0/18:1 is the major homologue comparing the area ratios of PEth homologues in blood samples from alcoholics. Additional prevalent homologues were PEth 16:0/18:2, 18:0/18:2, and 18:0/18:1. The homologues occurring in blood samples from alcoholics as well as from social drinkers were mostly the same, but differences among their distribution pattern were observed.

CONCLUSIONS:

In addition to the approach to quantitate the PEth homologue 16:0/18:1, this is a new and alternative proceeding for the differentiation between alcoholics and social drinkers using this alcohol consumption marker.

Copyright © 2013 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

KEYWORDS:

Biomarker for Alcohol Abuse; Homologues; LC-MS/MS; Phosphatidylethanol

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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