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Mol Biol Rep. 2014 Mar;41(3):1871-7. doi: 10.1007/s11033-014-3036-6. Epub 2014 Jan 17.

p53 signaling pathway polymorphisms associated to recurrent pregnancy loss.

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  • 1Post-Graduation Program in Genetics and Molecular Biology, Departament of Genetics, Biosciences Institute, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Caixa Postal 15031 - Agencia Campus UFRGS, Porto Alegre, RS, 91501-970, Brazil,


The p53 protein is known for performing essential functions in the maintenance of genomic stability in somatic cells and prevention of tumor formation. Studies of the p53 signaling pathway have suggested associations between some polymorphisms and infertility, post-in vitro fertilization implantation failure and recurrent abortions. The TP53 Pro72Arg polymorphism has been implicated as a risk factor for recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL); however, the association is controversial. In this study, our objective was to evaluate selected polymorphisms in genes of the p53 signalling pathway [TP53 c.215G>C (Pro72Arg), MDM2 c.14+309T>G (SNP309) and LIF c.1414T>G in the region 3' UTR] and determine their effect as risk factors for RPL. In a case-control study, we investigated 120 women with two or more pregnancy losses and 143 fertile control women reporting at least two live births and no history of pregnancy loss. When analyzed separately, the allele and genotype distributions of the polymorphisms in the two groups were not different. However, in a multivariate analysis adjusted for alcohol consumption, smoking, ethnicity, and number of pregnancies, the interaction between the genotypes TP53 Arg/Arg (rs1042522) and MDM2 TT (rs2279744) showed to be associated to RPL, increasing the risk for this condition (OR = 2.58, 95% CI: 1.31-5.07, p = 0.006). In conclusion, our study indicates that the combination of TP53 Arg/Arg (rs1042522) and MDM2 TT (rs2279744) genotypes may be a risk factor for RPL.

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