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Hand (N Y). 2013 Jun;8(2):195-200. doi: 10.1007/s11552-012-9473-6.

Suture button suspension following trapeziectomy in a cadaver model.

Author information

  • 1Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University Medical Center, 450 Broadway St, Pavilion C, Redwood City, CA 94063 USA.
  • 2Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University Medical Center, 450 Broadway St, Pavilion C, Redwood City, CA 94063 USA ; 450 Broadway Street, MC 6342 Pavilion A, 2nd floor, Department A26, Redwood City, CA 94063 USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The safety and the effects of different trajectories on thumb motion of suture-button suspensionplasty post-trapeziectomy are not known.

METHODS:

In a cadaveric model, thumb range of motion, trapeziectomy space height, and distance between the device and nerve to the first dorsal interosseous muscle (first DI) were measured for proximal and distal trajectory groups. Proximal trajectory was defined as a suture button angle directed from the thumb metacarpal to the second metacarpal at a trajectory less than 60° from the horizontal; distal trajectory was defined as a suture button angle directed from the thumb metacarpal to the second metacarpal at a trajectory of greater than 60° from the horizontal (Fig. 1).

RESULTS:

There were no significant differences in range of motion and trapeziectomy space height between both groups. The device was significantly further away from the nerve to the first DI in the proximal trajectory group compared to the distal trajectory group, but was still safely away from the nerve in both groups (greater than 1 cm).

CONCLUSIONS:

These results suggest that the device placement in either a proximal or distal location on the second metacarpal will yield similar results regarding safety and thumb range of motion.

KEYWORDS:

Safety; Suture button suspensionplasty; Thumb carpometacarpal arthritis; Trajectory; Trapeziectomy

PMID:
24426918
[PubMed]
PMCID:
PMC3652989
Free PMC Article

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