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Brain Res Bull. 2014 Jun;105:2-7. doi: 10.1016/j.brainresbull.2013.12.011. Epub 2014 Jan 4.

Enhance, delete, incept: manipulating hippocampus-dependent memories.

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  • 1Institute of Behavioural Neuroscience, Research Department of Cognitive, Perceptual and Brain Sciences, Division of Psychology and Language Sciences, University College London, 26 Bedford Way, London WC1H 0AP, UK. Electronic address: h.spiers@ucl.ac.uk.
  • 2Institute of Behavioural Neuroscience, Research Department of Cognitive, Perceptual and Brain Sciences, Division of Psychology and Language Sciences, University College London, 26 Bedford Way, London WC1H 0AP, UK. Electronic address: d.bendor@ucl.ac.uk.

Abstract

Here we provide a brief overview of recent research on memory manipulation. We focus primarily on memories for which the hippocampus is thought to be required due to its central importance in the study of memory. The repertoire of methods employed is expanding and includes optogenetics, transcranial stimulation, deep brain stimulation, cued reactivation during sleep and the use of pharmacological agents. In addition, the possible mechanisms underlying these memory changes have been investigated using techniques such as single unit recording and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Memory enhancement'.

Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Extinction; Fear conditioning; Hippocampus; Memory consolidation; Reconsolidation; Sleep

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