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Br Poult Sci. 2014 Feb;55(1):44-53. doi: 10.1080/00071668.2013.872770.

Pharmacodynamic evaluation of a reference and a generic toltrazuril preparation in broilers experimentally infected with Eimeria tenella or E. acervulina.

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  • 1a Departamento de ParasitologĂ­a, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria y Zootecnia , Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico , Mexico City , Mexico.

Abstract

Abstract 1. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects on pigmentation, faecal oocyst output, immune responsiveness and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation following treatment with either the reference toltrazuril (Baycox) or a generic preparation (gen-TTZ), during an experimental Eimeria tenella (Et) or E. acervulina (Ea) infection of 210 Ross broiler chickens. 2. Results showed a significant difference on the anticoccidial efficacy 6 d after treating infected animals with Baycox (Et: 99.69% and Ea: 99.52%) or gen-TTZ (Et:85.71% and Ea 81.81%). 3. Gen-TTZ-treated animals were less strongly carotenoid-pigmented than Baycox-treated broilers. Mean plasma carotenoid concentrations were significantly higher in groups treated with Baycox than in broilers given gen-TTZ. 4. Treatment of animals with Baycox led to a significant decrease in ability of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells to produce ROS in contrast to gen-TTZ-treated groups. Baycox, but not generic toltrazuril, increased IL-10 and decreased tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) concentrations in chickens infected with E. tenella and E. acervulina. 5. It is suggested that differences in anticoccidial efficacy may be observed when using a generic toltrazuril product. Hence, in addition to plasma profiles of drugs, standardised clinical control tests may be necessary for generic formulations, particularly if other parameters are important to achieve a better control of coccidiosis.

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