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Exp Ther Med. 2014 Feb;7(2):371-374. Epub 2013 Dec 11.

Increased expression of chymase in inflammatory polyps in elderly patients with functional bowel disorder.

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  • 1Department of Geratology, No.454 Hospital of PLA, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210002, P.R. China.
  • 2Department of Gastroenterology, Nanjing Jin Ling Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210002, P.R. China.

Abstract

Chymase, a chymotrypsin-like protease, is a non-angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) angiotensin II (Ang II)-generating enzyme. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether chymase activity was increased in inflammatory polyps of elderly patients with functional bowel disorder (FBD). This study enrolled 45 elderly patients with FBD and 44 healthy control individuals. Expression of chymase in intestinal mucosa was assessed using fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry (IHC). IHC showed an increased number of chymase-positive mast cells in inflammatory polyps than in healthy intestinal mucosa (P<0.05). Compared with healthy mucosa, expression of chymase at the mRNA and protein level was significantly higher in inflammatory polyps. The frequencies of the chymase GG genotype and the G allele type were higher in the intestinal mucosa of patients with FBD compared with healthy controls (66.67 versus 40.91%, 81.11 versus 63.63%, both P<0.05). The frequency of the G allele type in the intestinal mucosa of the C4 subgroup of FBD was higher than that in the control group. However, in other FBD subgroups, there was no difference between patients and controls. Based on the fact that enhanced chymase expression was observed in inflammatory polyps of elderly patients with FBD relative to those in healthy controls, it was concluded that chymase has a significant role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory polyps in elderly patients with FBD.

KEYWORDS:

chymase; elderly; functional bowel disorder; intestinal inflammatory polyps

PMID:
24396407
[PubMed]
PMCID:
PMC3881056
Free PMC Article
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