Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Exp Gerontol. 2014 Mar;51:65-70. doi: 10.1016/j.exger.2013.12.012. Epub 2014 Jan 2.

Renal function in familial longevity: the Leiden Longevity Study.

Author information

  • 1Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands.
  • 2Department of Gerontology and Geriatrics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands; Netherlands Consortium for Healthy Ageing, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands.
  • 3Department of Gerontology and Geriatrics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands; Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Gerontology and Geriatrics, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
  • 4Department of Gerontology and Geriatrics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands; Institute for Evidence-Based Medicine in Old Age, Leiden, The Netherlands.
  • 5Netherlands Consortium for Healthy Ageing, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands; Department of Molecular Epidemiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands.
  • 6Department of Gerontology and Geriatrics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands; Leyden Academy on Vitality and Ageing, Leiden, The Netherlands.
  • 7Department of Gerontology and Geriatrics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands; Netherlands Consortium for Healthy Ageing, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. Electronic address: craen@lumc.nl.

Abstract

Studying renal function in subjects with a familial propensity for longevity may provide insight in (un)known mechanisms that determine the age-related decline in renal function of normal subjects. In the Leiden Longevity Study, middle-aged offspring of non-agenarian siblings and their partners as environmentally matched controls were included. Information was collected on lifestyle, medical history, medication use, and a non-fasting blood sample was drawn. Renal function (estimated glomerular filtration rate, eGFR) was assessed with the Chronic Kidney Disease epidemiology collaboration (CKD-EPI) formula. Linear mixed models were used to account for familial dependencies within the offspring and all analyses were stratified by sex. eGFR was similar between female offspring and female controls (0.44ml/min/1.73m(2) (SE 0.72) difference, p=0.54, age-adjusted). Male offspring had a higher eGFR compared to male controls (1.78ml/min/1.73m(2) (SE 0.78) difference, p=0.022, age-adjusted), and further adjustments for various characteristics did not materially change this difference. Among men with a history of hypertension, or myocardial infarction and/or stroke, offspring had a higher eGFR compared to controls (4.74ml/min/1.73m(2) (SE 1.53) difference, p=0.002, age-adjusted, and 6.21ml/min/1.73m(2) (SE 2.85) difference, p=0.033, age-adjusted, respectively). Middle-aged men, but not women, with a propensity for longevity have better renal function compared to environmentally matched controls, especially among those with a history of cardiovascular disease.

Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Aging; Cardiovascular disease; Longevity; Renal function; Sex

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk