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Hum Genet. 2014 Jun;133(6):769-79. doi: 10.1007/s00439-013-1415-z. Epub 2014 Jan 3.

Analysis of coding variants identified from exome sequencing resources for association with diabetic and non-diabetic nephropathy in African Americans.

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  • 1Program in Molecular Medicine and Translational Science, Wake Forest School of Medicine, 1 Medical Center Blvd., Winston-Salem, NC, 27157, USA.

Abstract

Prior studies have identified common genetic variants influencing diabetic and non-diabetic nephropathy, diseases which disproportionately affect African Americans. Recently, exome sequencing techniques have facilitated identification of coding variants on a genome-wide basis in large samples. Exonic variants in known or suspected end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) or nephropathy genes can be tested for their ability to identify association either singly or in combination with known associated common variants. Coding variants in genes with prior evidence for association with ESKD or nephropathy were identified in the NHLBI-ESP GO database and genotyped in 5,045 African Americans (3,324 cases with type 2 diabetes associated nephropathy [T2D-ESKD] or non-T2D ESKD, and 1,721 controls) and 1,465 European Americans (568 T2D-ESKD cases and 897 controls). Logistic regression analyses were performed to assess association, with admixture and APOL1 risk status incorporated as covariates. Ten of 31 SNPs were associated in African Americans; four replicated in European Americans. In African Americans, SNPs in OR2L8, OR2AK2, C6orf167 (MMS22L), LIMK2, APOL3, APOL2, and APOL1 were nominally associated (P = 1.8 × 10(-4)-0.044). Haplotype analysis of common and coding variants increased evidence of association at the OR2L13 and APOL1 loci (P = 6.2 × 10(-5) and 4.6 × 10(-5), respectively). SNPs replicating in European Americans were in OR2AK2, LIMK2, and APOL2 (P = 0.0010-0.037). Meta-analyses highlighted four SNPs associated in T2D-ESKD and all-cause ESKD. Results from this study suggest a role for coding variants in the development of diabetic, non-diabetic, and/or all-cause ESKD in African Americans and/or European Americans.

PMID:
24385048
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC4024071
Free PMC Article
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