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Nutr Res Pract. 2013 Dec;7(6):488-94. doi: 10.4162/nrp.2013.7.6.488. Epub 2013 Nov 29.

The effects of elimination diet on nutritional status in subjects with atopic dermatitis.

Author information

  • 1Department of Food & Nutrition, Seojeong College, Yangju 482-777, Korea.
  • 2Department of Food & Nutrition, Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-dong, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791, Korea.
  • 3Division of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Chungnam National University Hospital, Daejeon 301-721, Korea.

Abstract

A food allergy is an adverse health effect arising from a specific immune response that occurs reproducibly upon exposure to a given food. In those with food allergies that are thought to cause aggravation of eczema, food avoidance is important. The objective of this study was to research the nutritional status of patients with food allergies. A total of 225 subjects diagnosed with atopic dermatitis underwent a skin prick test as well as measurement of serum immunoglobulin E. Food challenge tests were conducted using seven food items: milk, eggs, wheat, soybeans, beef, pork, and chicken. At post-food challenge visits to the test clinic, participants completed a three-day dietary record, which included two week days and one weekend day, in order to evaluate energy intake and diet quality during the challenge. We analyzed nutrient intake based on differential food allergens. Subjects with a food allergy to milk showed lower intake of Ca, Zn, and vitamin B2, and subjects with a food allergy to egg showed lower intake of vitamin A, B1, B2, niacin, and cholesterol. Subjects with a food allergy to wheat and soybean showed lower intake of Ca, P, Fe, K, Zn, vitamin B2, vitamin B6, and niacin; and subjects with a food allergy to beef, pork, and chicken showed lower intake of Fe and higher intake of K, vitamin A, B2. Subjects with atopic dermatitis were lacking in several nutrients, including vitamin A and vitamin C. A greater number of food allergies showed an association with a greater number of nutrient intake deficiencies. Allergen avoidance is the basic treatment for atopic dermatitis. However, when the allergen is food, excessive restriction can lead to nutrition deficiency. Findings of this study suggest the necessity for enhanced nutritional education in order to provide substitute foods for patients with food allergies who practice food restriction.

KEYWORDS:

Food allergy; atopic dermatitis; food restriction

PMID:
24353835
[PubMed]
PMCID:
PMC3865272
Free PMC Article
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