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HIV Clin Trials. 2013 Nov-Dec;14(6):303-12. doi: 10.1310/hct1406-303.

Pilot study of pioglitazone and exercise training effects on basal myocardial substrate metabolism and left ventricular function in HIV-positive individuals with metabolic complications.

Author information

  • 1Program in Physical Therapy, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri.
  • 2Division of Geriatrics and Nutritional Science, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri.
  • 3Division of Infectious Disease, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri.
  • 4Department of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri.
  • 5Cardiovascular Division, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri.
  • 6Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism, & Lipid Research, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Individuals with HIV infection and peripheral metabolic complications have impaired basal myocardial insulin sensitivity that is related to left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction. It is unknown whether interventions shown to be effective in improving peripheral insulin sensitivity can improve basal myocardial insulin sensitivity and diastolic function in people with HIV and peripheral metabolic complications.

OBJECTIVE:

In a pilot study, we evaluated whether the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-γ) agonist pioglitazone or combined endurance and resistance exercise training improves basal myocardial insulin sensitivity and diastolic function in HIV+ adults with peripheral metabolic complications.

DESIGN:

Twenty-four HIV+ adults with metabolic complications including peripheral insulin resistance were randomly assigned to 4 months of pioglitazone (PIO; 30 mg/d) or supervised, progressive endurance and resistance exercise training (EXS; 90-120 min/d, 3 d/wk). Basal myocardial substrate metabolism was quantified by radioisotope tracer methodology and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, and LV function was measured by echocardiography.

RESULTS:

Twenty participants completed the study. Neither PIO nor EXS resulted in a detectable improvement in basal myocardial insulin sensitivity or diastolic function. Post hoc analyses revealed sample sizes of more than 100 participants are needed to detect significant effects of these interventions on basal myocardial insulin sensitivity and function.

CONCLUSIONS:

PIO or EXS alone did not significantly increase basal myocardial insulin sensitivity or LV diastolic function in HIV+ individuals with peripheral metabolic complications.

KEYWORDS:

HIV; exercise; insulin resistance; left ventricular dysfunction; metabolic syndrome

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