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Pharmacol Biochem Behav. 2014 Jan;116:129-36. doi: 10.1016/j.pbb.2013.11.029. Epub 2013 Dec 4.

A mouse model mimicking human first night effect for the evaluation of hypnotics.

Author information

  • 1State Key Laboratory of Medical Neurobiology, Shanghai Medical College of Fudan University, Shanghai, China.
  • 2Department of Pharmacology, Shanghai Medical College of Fudan University, Shanghai, China.
  • 3Department of Pharmacology, Shanghai Medical College of Fudan University, Shanghai, China; Institutes of Brain Science, Shanghai Medical College of Fudan University, Shanghai, China.
  • 4International Institute for Integrative Sleep Medicine (WPI-IIIS), University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan.
  • 5International Institute for Integrative Sleep Medicine (WPI-IIIS), University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Japan; Department of Molecular Behavioral Biology, Osaka Bioscience Institute, Suita, Japan.
  • 6State Key Laboratory of Medical Neurobiology, Shanghai Medical College of Fudan University, Shanghai, China; Department of Pharmacology, Shanghai Medical College of Fudan University, Shanghai, China; Institutes of Brain Science, Shanghai Medical College of Fudan University, Shanghai, China. Electronic address: huangzl@fudan.edu.cn.

Abstract

In humans, a first night effect (FNE) is characterized by increased sleep latency and decreased total sleep time in an unfamiliar environment, but the mechanism and treatment options for this universally experienced acute insomnia are unclear. We continuously recorded electroencephalography (EEG) and electromyogram (EMG) and measured plasma corticosterone levels to develop a mouse FNE model by inducing acute insomnia in mice that have been placed in unfamiliar cage environments. The sleep latency of mice 'moved to clean cages' (MCC) was longer than that for mice 'moved to dirty ones' (MDC). As compared to MDC mice, MCC mice showed stronger decreases in the amount of non-rapid eye movement (non-REM, NREM) and REM sleep, with a lower power density of NREM sleep, increased fragmentation and decreased stage transitions from NREM sleep to wake, and higher variation in plasma corticosterone levels. Treatment of MCC mice with zolpidem, diazepam, raclopride, pyrilamine, except SCH23390 shortened NREM sleep latency. In addition, zolpidem significantly increased NREM and REM sleep with the increase in slow wave activity (1.00-2.75 Hz), while raclopride significantly increased NREM and REM sleep without changing the EEG power density in MCC mice, whereas diazepam increased sleep with a drastic decrease in power density of the frequency band between 1.00 and 4.00 Hz, diazepam also increased the frequency band between 9.75 and 24.75 Hz during NREM sleep. These results indicate that a MCC mouse can mimic a FNE phenotype of humans and that zolpidem and raclopride may be useful drugs to prevent acute insomnia, including FNE.

Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

BZ; D(1)R; D(2)R; EEG; EMG; FNE; First night effect; H(1)R; Insomnia; KO; MCC; MDC; NREM; REM; Raclopride; Sleep; Zolpidem; benzodiazepine; dopamine D(1) receptor; dopamine D(2) receptor; electroencephalography; electromyogram; first night effect; histamine H1 receptor; knock out; mice moved to clean cages; mice moved to dirty cages; non-rapid eye movement; rapid eye movement

PMID:
24316349
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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