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Brain Stimul. 2014 Mar-Apr;7(2):190-3. doi: 10.1016/j.brs.2013.11.001. Epub 2013 Nov 7.

FMRI of deep brain stimulation at the rat ventral posteromedial thalamus.

Author information

  • 1Research Imaging Institute, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229, USA; Department of Neurology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA; Biomedical Research Imaging Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA; Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA. Electronic address: shihy@unc.edu.
  • 2Research Imaging Institute, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229, USA; Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78249, USA.
  • 3Research Imaging Institute, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229, USA.
  • 4Research Imaging Institute, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229, USA; South Texas Veterans Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, USA. Electronic address: duongt@uthscsa.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of deep brain stimulation (DBS) has potentials to reveal neuroanatomical connectivity of a specific brain region in vivo.

OBJECTIVE:

This study aimed to demonstrate frequency and amplitude tunings of the thalamocortical tract using DBS fMRI at the rat ventral posteromedial thalamus.

METHODS:

Blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) fMRI data were acquired in a total of twelve rats at a high-field 11.7 T MRI scanner with modulation of nine stimulus frequencies (1-40 Hz) and seven stimulus amplitudes (0.2-3.6 mA).

RESULTS:

BOLD response in the barrel cortex peaked at 25 Hz. The response increased with stimulus amplitude and reached a plateau at 1 mA. Cortical spreading depolarization (CSD) was observed occasionally after DBS that carries >10% BOLD waves spanning the entire ipsilateral cortex.

CONCLUSION:

fMRI is sensitive to the frequency effect of DBS and has potential to investigate the function of a particular neuroanatomical pathway.

Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Deep brain stimulation; Isoflurane; Rat; Striatum; Thalamus; fMRI

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