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J Asthma. 2014 Apr;51(3):267-74. doi: 10.3109/02770903.2013.867349. Epub 2013 Dec 19.

An asthma sports camp series to identify children with possible asthma and cardiovascular risk factors.

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  • 1Duquesne University, Mylan School of Pharmacy , Pittsburgh, PA , USA .

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The prevalence of asthma and obesity in children has increased over the past several years, with obesity being associated with higher rates of asthma. In response to known disparities in asthma prevalence and morbidity, along with barriers to diagnosis, assessment and education, a comprehensive asthma sports camp series was developed and implemented.

OBJECTIVE:

The primary objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of utilizing a sports camp model to identify children with undiagnosed and uncontrolled asthma, and to provide recommendations for follow-up care. The secondary objectives were to identify the presence of and associations between related co-morbidities and risk factors for asthma morbidity such as obesity, hypertension and exposure to tobacco smoke; and to assess asthma medication use.

METHODS:

Six daylong camps at an inner-city university were offered to children 5-17 years of age over a period of two years. Asthma, body mass index, blood pressure (BP) and carbon monoxide screenings were conducted at each camp.

RESULTS:

In this sample, 43.7% of children had previously diagnosed asthma, and 12.6% were classified as having potential, undiagnosed asthma. Of the children with previously diagnosed asthma, 76% were considered uncontrolled. Thirty-eight percent were determined to be overweight or obese and 17% had elevated BP.

CONCLUSIONS:

An interdisciplinary sports camp model can be used to identify children with undiagnosed and uncontrolled asthma and cardiovascular risk factors; and to provide recommendations for follow-up care.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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