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Biosens Bioelectron. 2014 Apr 15;54:358-64. doi: 10.1016/j.bios.2013.10.045. Epub 2013 Nov 18.

Highly sensitive fluorescent immunosensor for detection of influenza virus based on Ag autocatalysis.

Author information

  • 1Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Analysis and Detection Technology for Food Safety (Fuzhou University), Fujian Province Key Laboratory of Analysis and Detection for Food Safety, Department of Chemistry, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, 350002 China; Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Minjiang University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350108 China.
  • 2Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Analysis and Detection Technology for Food Safety (Fuzhou University), Fujian Province Key Laboratory of Analysis and Detection for Food Safety, Department of Chemistry, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, 350002 China.
  • 3Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Minjiang University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350108 China.
  • 4Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong, China. Electronic address: zwcai@hkbu.edu.hk.
  • 5Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Analysis and Detection Technology for Food Safety (Fuzhou University), Fujian Province Key Laboratory of Analysis and Detection for Food Safety, Department of Chemistry, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, 350002 China. Electronic address: gnchen@fzu.edu.cn.

Abstract

A versatile, ultrasensitive immunosensor for detection of influenza virus was designed by combining silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) labeled antibodies with indirect fluorescence. A new technology using Ag-S covalent binding was applied for antibody labeling. Influenza A (H1N1) virus, as a subtype of influenza A virus that was the most common cause of human influenza (flu), was acted as the target antigen using sandwich type-immunoreactions on the high binding ELISA plates. The antibody-labeled Ag NPs were then released by acid solution to produce Ag(+) which can catalyze o-phenylenediamine (OPDA) oxidation to produce fluorescence for highly sensitive detection. Under the optimal conditions, it shows good linear relationship between fluorescence intensity and the logarithm of the concentration of H1N1 over the range of 1.0×10(-12)-1.0×10(-8) g mL(-1) with a detection limit (LOD, 3σ) of 1.0×10(-13) g mL(-1). Results indicated that the proposed method give a good sensitivity and simple operation for detecting the influenza virus. This work also provided a promising potential for antigen detection by Ag NPs labeled, and the steps were easy to handle.

© 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

KEYWORDS:

Fluorescent immunoassay; H1N1 Influenza virus; OPDA; Silver nanoparticles

PMID:
24292140
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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