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Eval Program Plann. 2014 Apr;43:38-47. doi: 10.1016/j.evalprogplan.2013.10.006. Epub 2013 Nov 7.

Qualitative evaluation of a Positive Prevention training for health care providers in Mozambique.

Author information

  • 1UCSF, Department of Community Health Systems, School of Nursing, United States. Electronic address: Sarah.Gutin@ucsf.edu.
  • 2Global AIDS Program, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Mozambique.
  • 3UCSF, Prevention and Public Health Group, Global Health Sciences, United States.
  • 4National Institute of Health, Ministry of Health, Mozambique.
  • 5UCSF, Department of Community Health Systems, School of Nursing, United States.

Abstract

The rapid scale-up of HIV care and treatment in Mozambique has provided an opportunity to reach people living with HIV (PLHIV) with prevention interventions in HIV care and treatment settings. A three-day Positive Prevention (PP) training intervention for health care providers that focused on pressing issues for PLHIV in Mozambique was adapted and delivered at sites in three provinces. In-depth interviews were conducted with 31 providers trained in the PP curriculum. Qualitative data were used to assess the appropriateness of the training materials and approach, which lessons providers learned and were able to implement and which PP messages were still difficult to deliver. Providers reported gaining numerous insights from the training, including how to conduct a risk assessment and client-centered counseling, negotiating disclosure, partner testing, condom use, PMTCT, treatment adherence and approaches for positive living. Training topics not commonly mentioned included discordance counseling, STIs, family planning, alcohol and drug use, and frank sexual risk discussions. While areas for improvement exist, the PP training was useful in transferring skills to providers and is a viable component of HIV care. This evaluation helps identify areas where future PP trainings and specific strategies and messages can be refined for the Mozambican context.

Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

HIV prevention; Mozambique; Positive Prevention; Prevention with Positives; Qualitative evaluation; Training intervention

PMID:
24291214
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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