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Brain Cogn. 2014 Feb;84(1):44-62. doi: 10.1016/j.bandc.2013.10.007. Epub 2013 Nov 25.

Inhibitory control gains from higher-order cognitive strategy training.

Author information

  • 1Center for BrainHealth, School of Behavioral & Brain Sciences, University of Texas at Dallas, United States. Electronic address: michael.motes@utd.edu.
  • 2Center for BrainHealth, School of Behavioral & Brain Sciences, University of Texas at Dallas, United States.
  • 3Center for BrainHealth, School of Behavioral & Brain Sciences, University of Texas at Dallas, United States; Callier Center for Communication Disorders, School of Behavioral & Brain Sciences, University of Texas at Dallas, United States.
  • 4Medical Scientist Training Program and Program in Neuroscience, Washington University in St. Louis, United States.
  • 5Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, United States.
  • 6Center for BrainHealth, School of Behavioral & Brain Sciences, University of Texas at Dallas, United States; Department of Neurology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, United States.

Abstract

The present study examined the transfer of higher-order cognitive strategy training to inhibitory control. Middle school students enrolled in a comprehension- and reasoning-focused cognitive strategy training program and passive controls participated. The training program taught students a set of steps for inferring essential gist or themes from materials. Both before and after training or a comparable duration in the case of the passive controls, participants completed a semantically cued Go/No-Go task that was designed to assess the effects of depth of semantic processing on response inhibition and components of event-related potentials (ERP) related to response inhibition. Depth of semantic processing was manipulated by varying the level of semantic categorization required for response selection and inhibition. The SMART-trained group showed inhibitory control gains and changes in fronto-central P3 ERP amplitudes on inhibition trials; whereas, the control group did not. The results provide evidence of the transfer of higher-order cognitive strategy training to inhibitory control and modulation of ERPs associated with semantically cued inhibitory control. The findings are discussed in terms of implications for cognitive strategy training, models of cognitive abilities, and education.

Published by Elsevier Inc.

KEYWORDS:

Cognitive control; Cognitive strategy training; Comprehension; Executive function; Inhibition; Inhibitory control; Reasoning; Transfer

PMID:
24286804
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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