Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed. 2014 Mar;99(2):F138-43. doi: 10.1136/archdischild-2013-304842. Epub 2013 Nov 25.

Compliance with the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative and impact on breastfeeding rates.

Author information

  • 1Boston College, , Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To examine compliance with the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) as well as evaluate the BFHI and its components on breastfeeding initiation and duration overall and according to maternal education level.

DESIGN:

Quasi-experimental study using data from the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) from 2004 to 2008.

SETTING:

Birth facilities in Maine.

PARTICIPANTS:

915 mothers who gave birth in four hospitals that were BFHI-accredited or became accredited and 1099 mothers from six matched non-BFHI facilities. Mothers reported on seven (of 10) BFHI practices (breastfeeding practice score 0-7) and receipt of a gift pack with formula (yes/no).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Self-report of breastfeeding initiation, any breast feeding for ≥4 weeks, exclusive breast feeding for ≥4 weeks.

RESULTS:

34.6% of mothers from BFHI-accredited facilities reported experiencing all seven BFHI breastfeeding practices, while 28.4% reported being given a gift pack with formula. Among mothers with lower education, the BFHI increased breastfeeding initiation by 8.6 percentage points (adjusted coefficient, 0.086 [95% CI, 0.01 to 0.16]) and, independently, each additional breastfeeding practice was associated with an average increase in breastfeeding initiation of 16.2 percentage points (adjusted coefficient, 0.162 [95% CI, 0.15 to 0.18]). Among all mothers and mothers with higher education, there was no effect of the BFHI on breastfeeding rates.

CONCLUSIONS:

Compliance with BFHI practices among BFHI-accredited facilities is not optimal and needs to be monitored, as greater compliance may have an even larger impact on breastfeeding rates and potentially reduce socio-economic disparities in breast feeding.

KEYWORDS:

Evidence Based Medicine; Infant Feeding

PMID:
24277661
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC4090088
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk