Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Nat Genet. 2014 Jan;46(1):88-92. doi: 10.1038/ng.2835. Epub 2013 Nov 24.

Minke whale genome and aquatic adaptation in cetaceans.

Author information

  • 11] Korea Institute of Ocean Science and Technology, Ansan, Republic of Korea. [2].
  • 21] Personal Genomics Institute, Genome Research Foundation, Suwon, Republic of Korea. [2].
  • 31] Beijing Genomics Institute (BGI)-Shenzhen, Shenzhen, China. [2].
  • 41] Korea Institute of Ocean Science and Technology, Ansan, Republic of Korea. [2] Department of Marine Biotechnology, University of Science and Technology, Daejeon, Republic of Korea.
  • 51] Korea Institute of Ocean Science and Technology, Ansan, Republic of Korea. [2] Department of Marine Biotechnology, University of Science and Technology, Daejeon, Republic of Korea. [3] Ocean Science and Technology School, Korea Maritime University, Busan, Republic of Korea.
  • 6Korea Institute of Ocean Science and Technology, Ansan, Republic of Korea.
  • 7Personal Genomics Institute, Genome Research Foundation, Suwon, Republic of Korea.
  • 8Theragen BiO Institute, TheragenEtex, Suwon, Republic of Korea.
  • 9Beijing Genomics Institute (BGI)-Shenzhen, Shenzhen, China.
  • 10Shaanxi Yulin Energy Group Co. Ltd., Yulin, Shaanxi, China.
  • 11Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Gachon University, Incheon, Republic of Korea.
  • 12Department of Biological Sciences, College of Natural Sciences, Pusan National University, Busan, Republic of Korea.
  • 13Laboratory of Genome Biology, Department of Animal Biotechnology, Konkuk University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
  • 14Division of Genetics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
  • 15Marine Mammal and Turtle Division, Southwest Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Fisheries Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, La Jolla, California, USA.
  • 16Theodosius Dobzhansky Center for Genome Bioinformatics, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg, Russia.
  • 17College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
  • 18Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
  • 19Marine Biodiversity Institute of Korea (MABIK), Ministry of Ocean and Fisheries, Sejong, Republic of Korea.
  • 20Evolutionary Ecology Group, Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.
  • 21Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA.
  • 22School of Systems Biomedical Science, Soongsil University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
  • 231] Beijing Genomics Institute (BGI)-Shenzhen, Shenzhen, China. [2] Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. [3] King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.
  • 241] Personal Genomics Institute, Genome Research Foundation, Suwon, Republic of Korea. [2] Theragen BiO Institute, TheragenEtex, Suwon, Republic of Korea. [3] Program in Nano Science and Technology, Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Seoul National University, Suwon, Republic of Korea. [4] Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology Nano Science and Technology, Suwon, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

The shift from terrestrial to aquatic life by whales was a substantial evolutionary event. Here we report the whole-genome sequencing and de novo assembly of the minke whale genome, as well as the whole-genome sequences of three minke whales, a fin whale, a bottlenose dolphin and a finless porpoise. Our comparative genomic analysis identified an expansion in the whale lineage of gene families associated with stress-responsive proteins and anaerobic metabolism, whereas gene families related to body hair and sensory receptors were contracted. Our analysis also identified whale-specific mutations in genes encoding antioxidants and enzymes controlling blood pressure and salt concentration. Overall the whale-genome sequences exhibited distinct features that are associated with the physiological and morphological changes needed for life in an aquatic environment, marked by resistance to physiological stresses caused by a lack of oxygen, increased amounts of reactive oxygen species and high salt levels.

PMID:
24270359
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC4079537
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk