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Am J Emerg Med. 2014 Feb;32(2):196.e1-2. doi: 10.1016/j.ajem.2013.09.024. Epub 2013 Sep 30.

Hemichorea after multiple bee stings.

Author information

  • 1Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Korea.
  • 2Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Korea.
  • 3Department of Emergency Medicine, College of Medicine, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Korea.
  • 4Department of Emergency Medicine, College of Medicine, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Korea. Electronic address: cpr@chungbuk.ac.kr.

Abstract

Bee sting is one of the most commonly encountered insect bites in the world. Despite the common occurrence of local and systemic allergic reactions, there are few reports of ischemic stroke after bee stings. To the best our knowledge, there have been no reports on involuntary hyperkinetic movement disorders after multiple bee stings. We report the case of a 50-year-old man who developed involuntary movements of the left leg 24 hours after multiple bee stings, and the cause was confirmed to be a right temporal infarction on a diffusion magnetic resonance imaging scan. Thus, we concluded that the involuntary movement disorder was caused by right temporal infarction that occurred after multiple bee stings.

PMID:
24268878
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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