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Ann Thorac Surg. 2014 Feb;97(2):467-73. doi: 10.1016/j.athoracsur.2013.10.017. Epub 2013 Nov 20.

A retrospective study on nonmalignant airway erosion after right transthoracic subtotal esophagectomy: incidence, diagnosis, therapy, and risk factors.

Author information

  • 1Division of Esophageal Surgery, Department of Surgery, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo, Japan; Department of Thoracic Surgery, Shanghai First People's Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, China.
  • 2Division of Esophageal Surgery, Department of Surgery, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. Electronic address: ytachimo@ncc.go.jp.
  • 3Division of Esophageal Surgery, Department of Surgery, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo, Japan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

This study investigated the incidence, diagnosis, treatment, and risk factors for nonmalignant airway erosion after subtotal esophagectomy for thoracic esophageal carcinoma.

METHODS:

Clinical data from all patients with thoracic esophageal carcinoma who underwent right transthoracic subtotal esophagectomy from 2000 to 2012 at our institution were retrospectively reviewed, and the clinical course and outcome of those who developed airway erosion were investigated in detail. Risk factors for airway erosion were calculated by multivariate analysis.

RESULTS:

Of 1,091 patients enrolled, 15 patients (1.4%) developed nonmalignant airway erosion, which occurred at postoperative day (POD) 7 to 92 (median, 24). Anastomotic leakage or gastric-tube necrosis was detected prior to airway erosion in 14 cases (93.3%). Endoscopic and surgical therapy was administrated to 3 patients. Airway erosion was cured in 9 patients (60.0%). Five patients died from airway erosion directly (mortality, 33.3%). Alimentary leakage or necrosis (p<0.001), preoperative radiotherapy (p=0.004), and reconstruction through the posterior mediastinal route (p=0.051) were independent risk factors for airway erosion development.

CONCLUSIONS:

Airway erosion is a fatal complication after subtotal esophagectomy. Preoperative radiotherapy dramatically increases the risk of developing airway erosion and reduces the probability of spontaneous healing. Aggressive treatment of alimentary leakage or necrosis and reconstruction through the anterior route help to decrease the risk of airway erosion, especially in high-risk patients.

Copyright © 2014 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

7

PMID:
24266952
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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