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Prev Med. 2014 Feb;59:19-24. doi: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2013.11.006. Epub 2013 Nov 18.

The lower quality of preventive care among forced migrants in a country with universal healthcare coverage.

Author information

  • 1Department for Ambulatory Care and Community Medicine, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland.
  • 2Department for Ambulatory Care and Community Medicine, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland; Service of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism, Lausanne University Hospital, Switzerland.
  • 3Department of General Internal Medicine, Inselspital, University of Bern, Switzerland.
  • 4Division of Internal Medicine, University Hospital of Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland.
  • 5Department of Community Medicine and Primary Care, University Hospitals of Geneva and Faculty of Medicine, Geneva, Switzerland.
  • 6Department of General Internal Medicine, Inselspital, University of Bern, Switzerland. Electronic address: Nicolas.Rodondi@insel.ch.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess the association between socio-demographic factors and the quality of preventive care and chronic care of cardiovascular (CV) risk factors in a country with universal health care coverage.

METHODS:

Our retrospective cohort assessed a random sample of 966 patients aged 50-80years followed over 2years (2005-2006) in 4 Swiss university primary care settings (Basel/Geneva/Lausanne/Zürich). We used RAND's Quality Assessment Tools indicators and examined recommended preventive care among different socio-demographic subgroups.

RESULTS:

Overall patients received 69.6% of recommended preventive care. Preventive care indicators were more likely to be met among men (72.8% vs. 65.4%; p<0.001), younger patients (from 71.0% at 50-59years to 66.7% at 70-80years, p for trend=0.03) and Swiss patients (71.1% vs. 62.7% in forced migrants; p=0.001). This latter difference remained in multivariate analysis adjusted for gender, age, civil status and occupation (OR 0.68; 95% CI 0.54-0.86). Forced migrants had lower scores for physical examination and breast and colon cancer screening (all p≤0.02). No major differences were seen for chronic care of CV risk factors.

CONCLUSION:

Despite universal healthcare coverage, forced migrants receive less preventive care than Swiss patients in university primary care settings. Greater attention should be paid to forced migrants for preventive care.

Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Forced migrants; Preventive care; Quality of care; Socio-demographic characteristics; Vulnerable populations

PMID:
24262974
[PubMed - in process]
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