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Compr Psychiatry. 2014 Apr;55(3):557-64. doi: 10.1016/j.comppsych.2013.09.012. Epub 2013 Oct 22.

Assessment of implicit self-esteem in bipolar manic and euthymic patients using the implicit association test.

Author information

  • 1Department of Psychiatry, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Seoul, South Korea; Institute of Behavioral Science in Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea.
  • 2Department of Psychiatry, Konyang University College of Medicine, Daejon, South Korea.
  • 3Institute of Behavioral Science in Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea; Department of Psychiatry, Seoul Bukbu Hospital, Seoul, South Korea.
  • 4Institute of Behavioral Science in Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea.
  • 5Institute of Behavioral Science in Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea; Department of Psychiatry, National Health Insurance Service Ilsan Hospital, Goyang, South Korea.
  • 6Department of Neuropsychiatry, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, South Korea.
  • 7Institute of Behavioral Science in Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea; Department of Psychiatry, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Severance Mental Health Hospital, Gwangju, South Korea. Electronic address: chs0225@yuhs.ac.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Although self-esteem is thought to be an important psychological factor in bipolar disorder, little is known about implicit and explicit self-esteem in manic patients. In this study, we investigated differences in implicit and explicit self-esteem among bipolar manic patients, bipolar euthymic patients, and healthy controls using the Implicit Association Test (IAT).

METHODS:

Participants included 19 manic patients, 27 euthymic patients, and 27 healthy controls. Participants completed a self-esteem scale to evaluate explicit self-esteem and performed the self-esteem IAT to evaluate implicit self-esteem.

RESULTS:

There were no differences among groups in explicit self-esteem. However, there were significant differences among groups in implicit self-esteem. Manic patients had higher IAT scores than euthymic patients and a trend toward higher IAT scores than healthy controls.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings suggest that, on the latent level, a manic state is not simply the opposite of a depressed state. Furthermore, there may be a discontinuity of implicit self-esteem between manic and euthymic states. These unexpected results may be due to characteristics of the study participants or the methods used to assess implicit self-esteem. Nevertheless, they provide greater insights on the psychological status of manic patients.

© 2014.

PMID:
24262123
[PubMed - in process]
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