Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Heart Lung Circ. 2014 May;23(5):414-21. doi: 10.1016/j.hlc.2013.10.084. Epub 2013 Oct 29.

Cost-effectiveness of interventions to prevent cardiovascular disease in Australia's indigenous population.

Author information

  • 1Centre for Health Policy, Programs and Economics, School of Population Health, The University of Melbourne, Carlton, Victoria 3010, Australia. Electronic address: ksong@unimelb.edu.au.
  • 2Deakin Health Economics, Deakin Strategic Research Centre - Population Health, Deakin University, Burwood Highway, Burwood, Victoria 3125, Australia.
  • 3Centre for Burden of Disease and Cost-effectiveness, School of Population Health, The University of Queensland, Herston Road, Herston, Queensland 4006, Australia.
  • 4Centre for Health Policy, Programs and Economics, School of Population Health, The University of Melbourne, Carlton, Victoria 3010, Australia.
  • 5Murrup Barak, Melbourne Institute for Indigenous Development, The University of Melbourne, Carlton, Victoria 3010, Australia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of disease burden in Australia's Indigenous population, and the greatest contributor to the Indigenous 'health gap'. Economic evidence can help identify interventions that efficiently address this discrepancy.

METHODS:

Five interventions (one community-based and four pharmacological) to prevent cardiovascular disease in Australia's Indigenous population were subject to economic evaluation. Pharmacological interventions were evaluated as delivered either via Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services or mainstream general practitioner services. Cost-utility analysis methods were used, with health benefit measured in disability-adjusted life-years saved.

RESULTS:

All pharmacological interventions produced more Indigenous health benefit when delivered via Indigenous health services, but cost-effectiveness ratios were higher due to greater health service costs. Cost-effectiveness ratios were also higher in remote than in non-remote regions. The polypill was the most cost-effective intervention evaluated, while the community-based intervention produced the most health gain.

CONCLUSIONS:

Local and decision-making contextual factors are important in the conduct and interpretation of economic evaluations. For Australia's Indigenous population, different models of health service provision impact on reach and cost-effectiveness results. Both the extent of health gain and cost-effectiveness are important considerations for policy-makers in light of government objectives to address health inequities and bridge the health gap.

Copyright © 2013 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Cardiovascular diseases; Economics, Medical; Health services, Indigenous; Prevention and control; Socioeconomic factors

PMID:
24252448
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk