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Environ Pollut. 2014 Feb;185:90-6. doi: 10.1016/j.envpol.2013.10.019. Epub 2013 Nov 13.

Air pollution effects on fetal and child development: a cohort comparison in China.

Author information

  • 1Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, 701 W. 168th Street, New York, NY 10027, USA, Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health. Electronic address: dt14@columbia.edu.
  • 2Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China.
  • 3Division of Atmospheric Sciences, Desert Research Institute, 2215 Raggio Parkway, Reno, NV 89512, USA.
  • 4Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, 701 W. 168th Street, New York, NY 10027, USA, Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health.
  • 5Division of Atmospheric Sciences, Desert Research Institute, 2215 Raggio Parkway, Reno, NV 89512, USA; Hong Kong Premium Services and Research Laboratory, Chai Wan, China.

Abstract

In Tongliang, China, a coal-fired power plant was the major pollution source until its shutdown in 2004. We enrolled two cohorts of nonsmoking women and their newborns before and after the shutdown to examine the relationship between prenatal exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and fetal and child growth and development. PAHs were used to measure exposure to air pollution generated by the power plant. Using PAH-DNA adduct levels as biomarkers for the biologically effective dose of PAH exposure, we examined whether PAH-DNA adduct levels were associated with birth outcome, growth rate, and neurodevelopment. Head circumference was greater in children of the second cohort, compared with the first (p = 0.001), consistent with significantly reduced levels of cord blood PAH-DNA adducts in cohort II (p < 0.001) and reduced levels of ambient PAHs (p = 0.01).

Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

Birth outcomes; China; Neurodevelopment; PAH–DNA adducts; Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

PMID:
24239591
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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