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Curr Biol. 2013 Nov 4;23(21):2079-89. doi: 10.1016/j.cub.2013.08.044. Epub 2013 Oct 24.

Tks5 and SHIP2 regulate invadopodium maturation, but not initiation, in breast carcinoma cells.

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  • 1Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461, USA; Gruss Lipper Biophotonics Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461, USA. Electronic address: ved.sharma@einstein.yu.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Tks5 regulates invadopodium formation, but the precise timing during invadopodium lifetime (initiation, stabilization, maturation) when Tks5 plays a role is not known.

RESULTS:

We report new findings based on high-resolution spatiotemporal live-cell imaging of invadopodium precursor assembly. Cortactin, N-WASP, cofilin, and actin arrive together to form the invadopodium precursor, followed by Tks5 recruitment. Tks5 is not required for precursor initiation but is needed for precursor stabilization, which requires the interaction of the phox homology (PX) domain of Tks5 with PI(3,4)P2. During precursor formation, PI(3,4)P2 is uniformly distributed but subsequently starts accumulating at the precursor core 3-4 min after core initiation, and conversely, PI(3,4,5)P3 gets enriched in a ring around the precursor core. SHIP2, a 5'-inositol phosphatase, localizes at the invadopodium core and regulates PI(3,4)P2 levels locally at the invadopodium. The timing of SHIP2 arrival at the invadopodium precursor coincides with the onset of PI(3,4)P2 accumulation. Consistent with its late arrival, we found that SHIP2 inhibition does not affect precursor formation but does cause decreases in mature invadopodia and matrix degradation, whereas SHIP2 overexpression increases matrix degradation.

CONCLUSIONS:

Together, these findings lead us to propose a new sequential model that provides novel insights into molecular mechanisms underlying invadopodium precursor initiation, stabilization, and maturation into a functional invadopodium.

Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PMID:
24206842
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3882144
Free PMC Article
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