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Nutr Hosp. 2013 Sep-Oct;28(5):1580-6. doi: 10.3305/nh.2013.28.5.6625.

Metabolic syndrome components can predict C reactive protein concentration in adolescents.

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  • 1School of Nutrition and 3NUPEB. Federal University of Ouro Preto. Ouro Preto. Minas Gerais. Brazil.

Abstract

in English, Spanish

BACKGROUND:

Metabolic syndrome (MS) is suggested to be associated with a low grade inflammation state, but the relationship between inflammation biomarkers and the components of metabolic syndrome in adolescents are still lacking.

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the association between C-reactive protein (CRP) serum concentrations and metabolic syndrome components in adolescents.

METHODS:

A cross-sectional population based study was conducted. Anthropometric, biochemical and clinical data were collected from 524 adolescents (11-15 years old) randomly sampled from school population of Alegre city, Espírito Santo, Brazil. Data were analyzed by STATA version 9.0.

RESULTS:

Adolescents with higher values for BMI (p = 0.001) and higher body fat percentage (p = 0.003) had higher CRP concentrations than those with lower BMI and body fat percentage. CRP concentrations was directly correlated with BMI (r = 0.17, p = 0.0001), waist circumference (r = 0.15, p = 0.0005), HDL-c (r = 0.13, p = 0.003), fasting insulin (r = 0.12, p = 0.003) and systolic blood pressure (r = 0.11, p with = 0.01). In the multiple linear regression analysis BMI (r = 0.05, p = 0.002), fasting glucose (r = -0.01, p = 0.003) and HDL-c (r = 0.017, p < 0.001) were associated to CRP concentrations after adjusting for the other components of MS.

CONCLUSION:

The association found between individual components of MS and CRP concentrations suggests that inflammation might be an early event in the development of metabolic disorders in adolescents.

Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

PMID:
24160219
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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