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Br J Sports Med. 2014 Aug;48(16):1227-34. doi: 10.1136/bjsports-2013-092576. Epub 2013 Oct 21.

High-intensity interval training in patients with lifestyle-induced cardiometabolic disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Author information

  • 1School of Human Movement Studies, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
  • 2Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, KG Jebsen Center of Exercise in Medicine at Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/AIM:

Cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) is a strong determinant of morbidity and mortality. In athletes and the general population, it is established that high-intensity interval training (HIIT) is superior to moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) in improving CRF. This is a systematic review and meta-analysis to quantify the efficacy and safety of HIIT compared to MICT in individuals with chronic cardiometabolic lifestyle diseases.

METHODS:

The included studies were required to have a population sample of chronic disease, where poor lifestyle is considered as a main contributor to the disease. The procedural quality of the studies was assessed by use of a modified Physiotherapy Evidence Base Database (PEDro) scale. A meta-analysis compared the mean difference (MD) of preintervention versus postintervention CRF (VO2peak) between HIIT and MICT.

RESULTS:

10 studies with 273 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Participants had coronary artery disease, heart failure, hypertension, metabolic syndrome and obesity. There was a significantly higher increase in the VO2peak after HIIT compared to MICT (MD 3.03 mL/kg/min, 95% CI 2.00 to 4.07), equivalent to 9.1%.

CONCLUSIONS:

HIIT significantly increases CRF by almost double that of MICT in patients with lifestyle-induced chronic diseases.

Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

KEYWORDS:

Aerobic Fitness/Vo2 Max; Cardiovascular; Exercise Physiology; Statistical Review

PMID:
24144531
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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